How to Know if a Make-Good Media Offer is Fair to You

How to Know if a Make-Good Media Offer is Fair to You

John Haggard

When commercials are ordered to run across across varied platforms like TV, Radio, Cable, Online Audio or Video, invariably some commercials will not run as originally ordered. This can happen due to a variety of issues including technical glitches, or even more likely, your commercial being “bumped out (pre-empted)” for an advertiser who is willing to pay a higher price. Depending upon how you negotiated your buy (whether or not spots would be preemptible and where any make-goods, defined as commercials made up in like-or-similar-programming with same ratings, would run if preempted), you should never take a rep’s word that you are being afforded an equal substitution when they present you a make-good offer. It’s not that reps are purposefully dishonest, but there are at least 3 reasons reps may not be working in your best interests: 1.) Your money is not their money that they are spending. No one will guard your money better than you; 2.) Reps are so busy that they do not take the time to carefully weigh what is in your best interest and instead slams an offer down that “looks” to be fair; this is partially because corporate America has cut back the number of sales assistants that many reps previously enjoyed; 3.) The program that they are offering you may actually have better ratings but a lower engagement rate than the program you bought, which actually makes the higher-rated programming a lesser value compared to the program you bought. One way to check engagement levels is to look at programs which have high tweet levels of engagement. Here is a link to find out: http://www.socialguide.com. In today’s advertising world, ratings alone are not the end all and do all; you also have to know if the audience that is being substituted as a make-good actually reaches your target buyer as well as the program that you originally purchased. And it is also very important to look at the demographic make-up of the program being offered because it is possible to have 2 program equally rated in Adults 25-54 for example, but when you break down the age cells, one program may be so heavy for Adults 45-54 that it makes the overall rating look good for Adults 25-44 when lumped together as an average in Adults 25-54. Don’t short-change yourself in potential sales revenue. Always ask for more information and proof that the offer is comparable or better.